Home Science and Nature The best telescopes for deep space in 2024

The best telescopes for deep space in 2024

by News7

We may earn revenue from the products available on this page and participate in affiliate programs. Learn more ›

Telescopes for deep space allow you to gaze at the wonders of our universe in a way that wouldn’t be possible with other telescopes. These powerful devices use larger apertures to gather loads of light, illuminating what would be too dim to see otherwise. Many even offer motorized mounts to move to the celestial objects you want to admire automatically. Whether you are a new astronomer or a seasoned pro, the best telescopes for deep space will broaden your horizons.

Best overall: Celestron NexStar 8SE

Best smart: Unistellar Equinox 2

Best splurge: Celestron Advanced VX 8 Edge HD

Best compact: Vaonis Vespera

Best budget: Sky-Watcher 8″ Flextube 200P

How we chose the best telescopes for deep space

Telescopes for deep space have more specific requirements than general telescopes. Because of this, we selected powerful scopes with large apertures and plenty of magnification. Beyond those two factors, we also looked for options with and without motorized mounts. Finally, we assessed the quality of the optics, build quality, mount type, and any extra features. We selected based on a mix of hands-on telescope experience, expert insight, editorial reviews, and user feedback. 

The best telescopes for deep space: Reviews & Recommendations

If you want to see beyond planets and our moon, you’ll need a telescope for deep space. These powerful scopes will open up the ability to gaze at deep sky objects (DSOs), such as star clusters, nebulas, and galaxies, providing new opportunities for epic stargazing sessions.

Best overall: Celestron NexStar 8SE

Specs

Optical design: Schmidt-Cassegrain

Mount: Computerized alt-azimuth  

Aperture: 203mm (8 inches)

Focal length: 2032mm

Eyepiece: 25mm (81x) Plössl

Weight: 24 pounds

Dimensions: 42.01 x 23.66 x 12.99 inches

Pros

Computerized mount makes tracking easy

Very sharp across entire field of view

Large aperture

Portable

Cons

Slewing results in some lag

Our best overall pick comes from one of the most trusted telescope manufacturers. The Celestron NexStar 8SE is a relatively portable Schmidt-Cassegrain scope. It weighs 24 pounds but is quite compact, so you can bring it to dark-sky locations if needed. 

This telescope for deep space offers a minimum useful magnification of 29x and a maximum useful magnification of 480x, making it a versatile tool for viewing a wide range of celestial objects, including planets. Plus, the eight-inch aperture captures plenty of light for DSOs. Provided you don’t have much light pollution, you’ll be able to see nebulas, galaxies, and more clearly.  

This type of telescope requires collimation, but Celestron’s SkyAlign makes it quick and easy, even for beginners. Another plus for beginners and pros alike is the included alt-azimuth mount, a fully automated Go-To mount. You can select from a database of 40,000 objects, and the telescope will automatically find it and track it across the sky for you. It also comes with a 25mm eyepiece, StarPointer finderscope, visual back, and mirror star diagonal. The NexStar 8SE is pricey, but you get a lot of value for that price that is hard to beat.

Best smart: Unistellar Equinox 2

Specs

Optical design: Newtonian reflector

Mount: Computerized alt-azimuth  

Aperture: 114mm

Focal length: 450mm

Eyepiece: Not applicable (no eyepiece)

Weight: 19.8 pounds

Dimensions: 18.6 x 11.2 x 30.4 inches

Pros

Very easy to use

Can be used from a distance

Filters out light pollution 

Portable

Good battery life

Cons

Expensive

Lack of an eyepiece isn’t for everyone

For those who want to gaze into the heavens from the comfort of their couch, the Unistellar Equinox 2 is the way to go. This smart telescope is unique in that it doesn’t feature an eyepiece. Instead, you pair the scope with the easy-to-use Unistellar app and view from there. This won’t be everyone’s cup of tea, but it makes deep space observation easier for groups and kids. It also came in handy for those mosquito-ridden Florida nights, as my husband and I could stargaze from inside.

The Equinox 2 features a sturdy base with a computerized alt-az mount. After an easy alignment process, you can search a database of 5,000 objects, including DSOs. Then, the telescope will automatically find and track them across the night sky. Or, you can use the in-app joystick to browse on your own. 

One of the best features of the Equinox 2 is its Deep Dark Technology, which filters out light pollution. This opens up stargazing even to those living in cities. Though I don’t live in a large city, there is a lot of light pollution, and it was remarkable what I was able to see with this setting turned on. Should you want to travel to dark sky locations, the telescope is relatively compact and portable, and you can even purchase a bundle with a backpack for easier transportation. Want an even more up-to-date (but also more expensive) model? Check out the newly announced Odyssey Pro.

Best splurge: Celestron Advanced VX 8 Edge HD

Specs

Optical design: Schmidt-Cassegrain

Mount: Computerized equatorial mount 

Aperture: 203mm (8 inches)

Focal length: 2032mm

Eyepiece: 12mm (150x) and 40mm (38x)

Weight: 61 pounds (full kit)

Dimensions: ‎9.1 x 9.1 x 9.1 inches

Pros

Very compact

Accurate Go-To mount

Extremely high-quality optics

Excellent for both astrophotography and observation

Cons

Mount isn’t sturdy enough for long-exposure astrophotography

Expensive

Our splurge pick is also one of the best telescopes for astrophotography. It features high-quality optics that fully correct for coma and field curvature, resulting in a truly flat field. Plus, the StarBright XLT coatings provide better light transmission for bright, sharp images. 

The included equatorial mount makes tracking objects easy, so you can make long observations or take long-exposure photos. It is computerized with Go-To functionality, making it easy to find and automatically track objects of interest. The mount even features ports for hand control, an autoguider, and two AUX ports for optional accessories. All those ports make it an ideal option for seasoned pros or for beginners who want something to grow into. 

Adding to the versatility of this scop is the ability to use three different f-stop configurations. You can attach a camera to the scope for f/10 or attach the eight-inch EdgeHD focal reducer to shoot at f/7. Finally, the EdgeHD is Fastar/Hyperstar compatible, making it possible to shoot at f/2. It is also quite compact, albeit fairly heavy, making it feasible to travel with. This is an expensive telescope for deep space, but you won’t be disappointed if you want something to last a long time or are looking for extremely high-quality optics.

Best compact: Vaonis Vespera

Specs

Optical design: Apochromatic (APO) quadruplet refractor

Mount: Computerized alt-azimuth  

Aperture: 50mm (2 inches)

Focal length: 200mm

Eyepiece: Not applicable

Weight: 11 pounds

Dimensions: 15 x 8 x 3.5 inches

Pros

Very compact and portable

Helps remove light pollution

Sleek, futuristic design

Ideal for group observations

Cons

Images aren’t very high-quality

The Vaonis Vespera is one of the best options If you love to travel and want a telescope for deep space to take along. Weighing only 11 pounds and measuring 15 by 8 by 3.5 inches,  the Vespera is very compact for what it provides. It also features a futuristic design, which will look nice sitting in your home. 

Like the Unistellar telescope, this option doesn’t offer an eyepiece. It can pair with up to five smartphones or tablets via the Singularity app, making it a fun way to stargaze with friends. Also like the Unistellar, it can filter out light pollution so that you can view DSOs even in cities. The telescope and app are both easy to use, so you’ll have no issues if you are a complete novice. 

The Vespera uses a Sony IMX462 image sensor to produce images. Unfortunately, this isn’t a great option if you want high-quality images of celestial objects. It only offers a resolution of 1920 by 1080 pixels, and users report that images are a little on the soft side. But it uses your phone’s GPS to calibrate yourself and automatically tracks objects, taking the work out of stargazing.

Best budget: Sky-Watcher 8″ Flextube 200P

Source : Popular Science

You may also like

The best telescopes for deep space in 2024 - The best telescopes for deep space in 2024 * The best telescopes for deep space in 2024 | The best telescopes for deep space in 2024 | The best telescopes for deep space in 2024 | The best telescopes for deep space in 2024 | | The best telescopes for deep space in 2024 | | The best telescopes for deep space in 2024 |

news7.asia The best telescopes for deep space in 2024